Who Has Most Say in Cooking?

22 Pages Posted: 7 Jan 2011

See all articles by Raghav Gaiha

Raghav Gaiha

University of Delhi - Department of Economics; Australian National University (ANU)

Raghbendra Jha

Australian National University (ANU) - Australia South Asia Research Centre (ASARC); Crawford School of Public Policy

Vani S. Kulkarni

Yale University - Department of Sociology

Date Written: November 2009

Abstract

The present analysis seeks to build on household economics literature by focusing on who in fact has most say in cooking-the female spouse, the husband or a senior female member/ the mother-in-law-and how this role is shaped by a diversity of factors (e.g. caste, type of family, demographic characteristics, educational attainments, affluence, and location). A complex but not implausible pattern is revealed in which all these variables matter in varying degrees. To the extent that caste, type of family, number of male and female adults in paid employment, their educational attainments, and lifestyle differences matter, the familiar story of a more decisive role of women in paid employment in influencing household allocation of resources for food, health and education needs reexamination. More importantly, if the patterns of decision-making revealed by our analysis are associated with more varied nutritional and other health related outcomes, the policies designed to influence the latter are far from obvious-especially in light of the important roles of cultural values and evolving lifestyle patterns.

Keywords: cooking decisions, family structure, caste, affluence, location

JEL Classification: D10, D12, H31, Q12

Suggested Citation

Gaiha, Raghav and Jha, Raghbendra and Kulkarni, Vani S., Who Has Most Say in Cooking? (November 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1735690 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1735690

Raghav Gaiha

University of Delhi - Department of Economics ( email )

Delhi-110007
India

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

Raghbendra Jha (Contact Author)

Australian National University (ANU) - Australia South Asia Research Centre (ASARC) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
+61 2 6125 2683 (Phone)
+61 2 6125 0443 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://crawford.anu.edu.au/crawford_people/content/staff/acde/rjha.php

Crawford School of Public Policy

ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
J.G. Crawford Building, #132, Lennox Crossing
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

Vani S. Kulkarni

Yale University - Department of Sociology ( email )

493 College St
New Haven, CT 06520
United States

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