Migrant Youths' Educational Achievement: The Role of Institutions

43 Pages Posted: 23 Nov 2011

See all articles by Deborah A. Cobb-Clark

Deborah A. Cobb-Clark

School of Economics, University of Sydney; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Mathias Sinning

Australian National University (ANU) - Crawford School of Public Policy

Steven Stillman

Free University of Bozen-Bolzano; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: November 2011

Abstract

We use 2009 Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) data to link institutional arrangements in OECD countries to the disparity in reading, math, and science test scores for migrant and native-born students. We find that achievement gaps are larger for those migrant youths who arrive later and for those who do not speak the test language at home. Institutional arrangements often serve to mitigate the achievement gaps of some migrant students while leaving unaffected or exacerbating those of others. For example, earlier school starting ages help migrant youths in some cases, but by no means in all. Limited tracking on ability appears beneficial for migrants’ relative achievement, while complete tracking and a large private school sector appear detrimental. Migrant students’ achievement relative to their native-born peers suffers as educational spending and teachers’ salaries increase, but is improved when examination is a component of the process for evaluating teachers.

Keywords: Migrant youths, PISA test scores, schools, institutions, academic achievement

JEL Classification: J13, J15, J24

Suggested Citation

Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. and Sinning, Mathias and Stillman, Steven, Migrant Youths' Educational Achievement: The Role of Institutions (November 2011). Melbourne Institute Working Paper No. 25/11. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1962998 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1962998

Deborah A. Cobb-Clark (Contact Author)

School of Economics, University of Sydney ( email )

606 Social Sciences Bldg. (A02)
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia
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IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Mathias Sinning

Australian National University (ANU) - Crawford School of Public Policy ( email )

ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
J.G. Crawford Building, #132, Lennox Crossing
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.mathiassinning.com

Steven Stillman

Free University of Bozen-Bolzano ( email )

Via Sernesi 1
39100 Bozen-Bolzano (BZ), Bozen 39100
Italy

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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