Will the Brain Ever Take the Stand? Canadian Law and the Admissibility of Neurotechnology Lie Detection Evidence

56 Criminal Law Quarterly 135 2010

29 Pages Posted: 12 Jul 2012

See all articles by Matthew Kutcher

Matthew Kutcher

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law

Victoria Apold

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law

Jocelyn Downie

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

This article is organized into four sections. The first section provides arguments to support the claim that an encounter between Canadian courts and Neurotechnology Lie Detection Evidence (NTLD) appears imminent; to this end, examples of increasing awareness of NTLD are discussed along with evidence of the introduction of related neurotechnologies in Canadian and U.S. courts.

Keywords: United States, criminal law, lie detection, neurotechnology, neuroscience, evidence, admissibility

Suggested Citation

Kutcher, Matthew and Apold, Victoria and Downie, Jocelyn, Will the Brain Ever Take the Stand? Canadian Law and the Admissibility of Neurotechnology Lie Detection Evidence (2010). 56 Criminal Law Quarterly 135 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2103790

Matthew Kutcher

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law ( email )

6061 University Avenue
6061 University Ave
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

Victoria Apold

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law ( email )

6061 University Avenue
6061 University Ave
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

Jocelyn Downie (Contact Author)

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine ( email )

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

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