Property Rights and Indigenous Tradition Among Early 20th Century Japanese Firms

13 Pages Posted: 8 Mar 2001  

Yoshiro Miwa

Osaka Gakuin University

J. Mark Ramseyer

Harvard Law School

Date Written: February 2001

Abstract

In several fields, modern academics trumpet the contingency of social science and the indeterminacy of institutional structures. The Japanese experience during the first half of the 20th century, however, instead tracks what much-derided chauvinists have claimed all along: modern legal institutions largely trump indigenous organizational frameworks, and modern rational-choice theory nicely predicts how people respond to such institutions. As orientalist as it may seem, such theory goes a long way toward explaining the real world in which we live.

JEL Classification: G3, K2, L6, N2, O5

Suggested Citation

Miwa, Yoshiro and Ramseyer, J. Mark, Property Rights and Indigenous Tradition Among Early 20th Century Japanese Firms (February 2001). Harvard Law and Economics Discussion Paper No. 311. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=262337 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.262337

Yoshiro Miwa (Contact Author)

Osaka Gakuin University ( email )

2-36-1 Kishibe-Minami
Suita, Osaka 5645811
Japan

J. Mark Ramseyer

Harvard Law School ( email )

1575 Massachusetts
Hauser 406
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-496-4878 (Phone)
617-496-6118 (Fax)

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