The ALI Copyright Restatement Project: A Horse of a Different Color?

Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Conference International Intellectual Property Law & Policy, Fordham University School of Law Skadden Conference Center, New York, New York, April 6, 2018

Texas A&M University School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 18-17

UC Berkeley Public Law Research Paper

Columbia Public Law Research Paper No. 14-602

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2018-35

25 Pages Posted: 22 Jun 2018 Last revised: 3 Oct 2018

See all articles by June M. Besek

June M. Besek

Columbia Law School

Peter S. Menell

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law

Irene Calboli

Texas A&M University School of Law; Nanyang Technological University (NTU) - Nanyang Business School

Devlin Hartline

George Mason University

Justin Hughes

Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Pierre N. Leval

Government of the United States of America - U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

William F. Patry

Google Inc. - Google

Date Written: April 6, 2018

Abstract

In announcing the Copyright Restatement project in 2015, the American Law Institute set its sights for the first time on restating a complex federal statutory regime as opposed to predominantly common law fields. While critical aspects of U.S. copyright law have a common law character — such as limiting doctrines, infringement standards, and the fair use doctrine — much of the regime is set forth in the U.S. Code. This panel discusses the first two years of the ALI Copyright Restatement Project and concerns that have been raised about fitting a comprehensive federal statutory regime into a template developed for restating judge-made state common law subjects.

Suggested Citation

Besek, June M. and Menell, Peter S. and Calboli, Irene and Hartline, Devlin and Hughes, Justin and Leval, Pierre N. and Patry, William F., The ALI Copyright Restatement Project: A Horse of a Different Color? (April 6, 2018). Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Conference International Intellectual Property Law & Policy, Fordham University School of Law Skadden Conference Center, New York, New York, April 6, 2018; Texas A&M University School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 18-17; UC Berkeley Public Law Research Paper; Columbia Public Law Research Paper No. 14-602; Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2018-35. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3200429 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3200429

June M. Besek (Contact Author)

Columbia Law School ( email )

435 West 116th St
New York, NY 10025
United States

Peter S. Menell

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law ( email )

215 Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States

Irene Calboli

Texas A&M University School of Law

1515 Commerce St.
Fort Worth, TX 76102
United States

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) - Nanyang Business School ( email )

Singapore, 639798
Singapore

Devlin Hartline

George Mason University ( email )

4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States

Justin Hughes

Loyola Law School Los Angeles ( email )

919 Albany Street
Los Angeles, CA 90015-1211
United States
213-736-8108 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.justinhughes.net

Pierre N. Leval

Government of the United States of America - U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ( email )

United States

William F. Patry

Google Inc. - Google ( email )

1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
Second Floor
Mountain View, CA 94043
United States

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