The Importance of Normative Beliefs to the Self-Prophecy Effect

Journal Applied Psychology. 2003 Jun; Vol 88(3): pp 423-31.

University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-377

10 Pages Posted: 26 Aug 2014

See all articles by David Sprott

David Sprott

Washington State University

Eric Richard Spangenberg

University of California, Irvine

Robert Fisher

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law

Date Written: June 1, 2002

Abstract

Asking people to predict whether they will undertake a target behavior increases their probability of performing that behavior. Now referred to as the self-prophecy effect, this phenomenon has been demonstrated across several contexts. Although theoretical explanations for the effect have been offered,empirical evidence for proposed accounts is sparse. The current research tests the theoretically relevant precondition for the effect that normative beliefs — evaluations of what is socially desirable or appropriate — underlie manifestation of the self-prophecy effect. Results of 2 experiments for different behaviors indicate that the act of making a prediction is most effective when normative beliefs are strong.Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to theoretical explanations for the effect and successful use of self-prophecy to promote socially desirable behaviors.

Suggested Citation

Sprott, David and Spangenberg, Eric Richard and Fisher, Robert, The Importance of Normative Beliefs to the Self-Prophecy Effect (June 1, 2002). Journal Applied Psychology. 2003 Jun; Vol 88(3): pp 423-31.; University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-377. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2274995

David Sprott (Contact Author)

Washington State University ( email )

Wilson Rd.
College of Business
Pullman, WA 99164
United States

Eric Richard Spangenberg

University of California, Irvine ( email )

4293 Pereira Drive
Suite 5600
Irvine, CA 92697-3125
United States
949-824-8470 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Spangenberg

Robert Fisher

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

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