The Neglect of Prescreening Information

Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 43, pp. 642-653, November

44 Pages Posted: 21 Nov 2006 Last revised: 28 Nov 2011

See all articles by Amitav Chakravarti

Amitav Chakravarti

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Chris Janiszewski

University of Florida - Department of Marketing

Gülden Ülkümen

University of Southern California

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

Several studies show that information used to screen alternatives becomes less important relative to information acquired latter in the search process simply because it was used to screen. Experiment 1 shows that the tendency to deemphasize prescreening information leads to systematically different choices for decision makers who screen alternatives, in comparison to decision makers who do not screen alternatives. Additional studies show that screening encourages decision makers to shift their emphasis from prescreening information to post-screening information (experiment 2). Prescreening information is deemphasized owing to the categorization that occurs when people create a consideration set of retained alternatives(experiments 3 and 4). Together, the results show that a brand's strength of consideration (i.e., how highly an option ranks on screening criteria) may have little influence on the likelihood it is chosen in a post-screening choice process.

Suggested Citation

Chakravarti, Amitav and Janiszewski, Chris and Ulkumen, Gulden, The Neglect of Prescreening Information (2006). Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 43, pp. 642-653, November. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=946203

Amitav Chakravarti (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

Chris Janiszewski

University of Florida - Department of Marketing ( email )

Gainesville, FL 32611
United States

Gulden Ulkumen

University of Southern California ( email )

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Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
(213) 740-3852 (Phone)
(213) 740-7828 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://mymarshall.usc.edu/portal/subapps/digitalmeasures/faculty.jsp?surveyId=890407

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